Community shows up to run in honor of Boston victims

CollegiateTimes.com

Runners start the commemorative jog at the beginning of the Huckleberry Trail on the corner of Draper Road and Miller Street.

Runners start the commemorative jog at the beginning of the Huckleberry Trail on the corner of Draper Road and Miller Street.

The mood was energized Monday night, as members of the community gathered to show support for those affected by the explosions in Boston last week by walking or running on the Huckleberry Trail.

The Runners for Boston runs are organized as part of a national effort by the Independent Running Retailers Association (IRRA).

At 6:30 p.m., Cortney Martin and Kirsten Thompson Mosby, who ran the marathon last week, spoke of their experiences, followed by a moment of silence at 6:42 p.m. to remember those injured or killed in Boston, as well as those in West Texas affected by the fertilizer plant explosion.

“Running is a lot about freedom and getting out in the world and being unencumbered and just going… this was such an affront and assault to what we love and value,” Martin said.

Thompson Mosby and her husband traveled to Boston with their children to run the marathon.

“I think sometimes the worst things bring out so much good in people,” Mosby said. “It was really humbling to know that in such a moment of tragedy there’s a lot of good still.”

The participants last night gathered for different reasons, but all shared the underlying hope of solidarity.

Sophomore health, nutrition, foods and exercise major Shacoria Winston participated last night to show her respect for the victims in Boston.

“It’s a time to promote unity amongst our campus again,” Winston said. “I feel like we’re used to tragedy and we’re used to events of this nature so the things that occurred in Boston are similar to what we have experienced. We need to show respect for them and show support in the same way that everyone else around the country has shown for us.”

Brett Sherfy — a graduate student in math education — sported blue and yellow, the colors of the Boston Marathon, while he ran Monday night.

“Races have always been a safe, energetic environment and I think that was all kind of taken away last Monday,” said Sherfy. “(The Boston Marathon) is still going to be the pinnacle of marathon running, but it’s never going to be the same.”

Runabout Sports, a member of the IRRA, hosted the event for the area and sold “Runners for Boston” t-shirts with 100 percent of the proceeds going to One Fun Boston aiding victims of the tragedy.

Owner of Runabout Sports, James DeMarco, called the Boston Marathon a celebration of life and endorses running as a good way to express emotions.

“One of the worst things you can do is dwell on things,” DeMarco said. “Running is definitely a proven way to get rid of…stress. If everybody ran more often I think we’d have a lot less violence in the world.”

Runabout Sports donated $300 to cover the cost of making the shirts and hope to raise $1,000 for the charity from sales.

One Fund Boston will distribute money to families most affected by the Boston Marathon explosions.

The cost of an amputation procedure ranges from $20,000-$60,000 with the average cost of a prosthesis being anywhere between a few thousand dollars and $40,000.

One Fund Boston has already raised over $10 million to donate to victims and families.

DeMarco predicts that next year the marathon will see more runners than ever before.

Martin is determined to return to run in Boston again next year and Sherfy hopes to qualify for the marathon one day.

“(At Virginia Tech) we have a really good understanding of uniting together after a tragic event,” Sherfy said. “I’ve seen what a community can do after (tragedy).”

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State Board of Health finalizes regulations for abortion clinics

CollegiateTimes.com

ImageOn Friday April 12, the Virginia State Board of Health voted 11-2 in favor of finalizing regulations for health and safety standards of abortion clinics that opponents fear could force some facilities to close.

Located just off of North Main Street, the local Planned Parenthood could face closure if they don’t comply with the new regulations.

Read our previous coverage on these regulations.

“They are an unfortunate and unnecessary intrusion into patient services,” said Cianti Stewart-Reid, Executive Director of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Virginia, of the law.

The regulations will require that any facility where five or more first-trimester abortions per month are performed, must meet the minimum standards for construction set for new hospital buildings.

In 2012, the Blacksburg Planned Parenthood provided 104 induced terminations of pregnancy.

Many pro-choice groups are concerned about the effect on Planned Parenthood facilities across the state, which provide a range of health services ranging from oral contraceptives, treatment of STDs and cancer screenings to abortions.

“It has the potential to (cause health centers to close) if they’re unable to comply with the restrictions,” said Stewart-Reid. “As a result, women would lose access to all the other services that are also provided at those centers.”

Among the regulations, those regarding design and construction could prove costly for many health centers.

However, President of the Virginia Society for Human Life Olivia Gans Turner does not foresee Planned Parenthood facilities closing due to the costs associated with regulated changes.

“Planned Parenthood has made a lot of noise… and yet Planned Parenthood will not shut its doors,” said Gans Turner. “They make a great deal of money off this business.”

Planned Parenthood, which receives money from the federal government, reported excess revenue of over $87 million for the 2011-2012 fiscal year. That same year, federal funding provided over $524 million to the organization.

The law states that the health centers will be required to maintain structural standards that include a five-foot width for public hallways, larger janitorial closets and a minimum of four parking spaces for each surgical room in the facility.

Opposition claims the regulations are a way to restrict women’s access to abortion.

“I think there’s no doubt that (the regulations) are politically motivated, and they clearly put politics above women’s health,” Stewart-Reid said.

Gans Turner, who has had an abortion, supports the actions of legislators.

“The Virginia Society of Human Life is very pleased with the (actions of the legislature) two years ago, making this proposal an effective law,” said Gans Turner. “The fact that the General Assembly saw fit to provide this protection for women… under the law, I think is a positive move.”

There have been additional arguments that the structural regulations in particular are not medically necessary.

“I’m disappointed that the Board of Health… did not listen to the medical experts who’ve made it very clear that these regulations are not medically necessary and will not improve women’s health care,” Stewart-Reid said.

The chair of the Board of Health and representative for EMS, Bruce Edwards, thinks otherwise, due to his experience in EMS.

“I think that the whole purpose of this… is to ensure that the places are safe and they are clean,” said Edwards. “From the standpoint of the structure, there needs to be adequate room in all these facilities so we can work on and take care of the patient.”

According to Edwards, each of the 20 abortion clinics in Virginia were issued licenses with corrective notices for simple fixes like placement of hand wash basins and sanitation aspects, as well as for more complicated, structural issues.

While changes to health care facilities in accordance with these regulations will be made by summer 2014, only one facility has expressed that it will not be able to comply with new regulations.

Upon inspections by the state medical examiner, 12 of the 20 clinics are in the process of, or are already in compliance.

Virginia is not alone in creating these types of regulations. Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Arkansas and Pennsylvania have adopted similar laws.

The recent death of a woman during an abortion procedure has provoked Maryland legislators to take action as well.

“This is a preventative and protective, reasonable action that is warranted. Unchecked abortion (clinics) sometimes become… unwilling to protect the women who walk into their doors,” Gans Turner said.

Planned Parenthood representatives assure pro-choice advocates that the organization will not be shut down overall.

The Blacksburg location for Planned Parenthood and the Roanoke Health Center are not sure how these regulations will affect their business or facilities just yet.

The Virginia Department of Health held a public comment period for two months in which over 6,000 comments were submitted. Of these comments, over 4,000 were in opposition to the new regulations.

Ten Virginia Senators, who originally voted in favor of the legislation in 2011, have recently expressed disapproval of the finalized regulations.

In a statement from nine of those senators, they said “The Attorney General’s office is incorrect in their interpretation… the (legislation) never required existing facilities to need new construction codes.”

Twenty-eight public commenters also shared the opinion that existing facilities be grandfathered in, and that construction guidelines should only apply to new health care facilities.

The Board of Health included a grandfather clause in its original write-up of regulations, however, they were forced to remove it in September 2012 after the General Attorney’s office deemed the clause was outside their realm of authority.

Medical professionals have also spoken out against the regulations.

“Such onerous and expensive structural facility requirements are not rationally related to enhancing the safety of first-trimester abortion procedure, nor prevent potential complications,” said Dr. Stephan Bendheim, chairman of the Department of OB/GYN at Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital, in a comment to the Board of Health.

Twenty-two Virginia delegates as well as the former chair of the Virginia State Board of Health, Fred Hannett, spoke in opposition to the regulations as well.

Though the regulations have already been passed, pro-choice groups won’t give up the fight.

“We will continue to organize our supporters to speak out against these regulations and to hopefully get them overturned,” Stewart-Reid said.

But the eyes are blind, one must look with the heart

Today I was able to experience something not many people can say they have. I was taught by a blind professor.

My boyfriend let me tag along to his ancient history class this morning, taught by a blind woman. He had talked about this teacher and her class many times so I was happy to have the opportunity to sit in on a lecture. It was a small class, of only 30 or so students, but she was not aware that I didn’t belong. I watched her seeing eye dog relax on the floor by her side as she routinely pulled up PowerPoint slides on her computer, listening closely to the text-to-speech narration. She then began to speak of the history of Islam with dates, people, events, places, and context to the beat of the maps and pictures on the slides from memory, without braille notes or a list of topics. The history of Islam was as familiar to her as if it were her own. Needless to say, I was in awe.

From my experience in school, history was always a reading-intensive subject with impossible amounts of people and places and dates to memorize and put into historical context. I was never meant to be a history major and have always despised the subject wholeheartedly, but still I struggled to grasp the idea that someone with a passion for history, blind or not, could remember all that information, let alone well enough to explain it to others. Especially, how could someone who isn’t able to read about the Nile River in textbooks, or see the Byzantine Empire on a map, or pictures of the patterned tile walls of a Mosque speak to their significance?

At an early age, children are put into categories in school. They are labeled as visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners (those who learn better by seeing, hearing, or doing, respectively). In a time when television and computer access for children is virtually inevitable, the population of auditory learners is slim at only 20-30% of students¹. Being a visual learner like my boyfriend, who, unlike myself, frequently falls asleep during lectures with no text supplement as evident this morning, it’s difficult to understand how auditory-dominant people can operate as efficiently. Then, it occurred to me how humans first began to relay information to one another, back in the times before Mesopotamia existed. The beginnings of history lie in spoken word. Before there was written language, there were elderly tribesmen telling stories to their grandsons, who remembered the stories and passed them on to their grandchildren. That was all there was of history and all there was of knowledge. It all made so much sense to me when I considered the fact that she teaches history, the story-telling subject. Her ability to remember and recount information in detailed stories reflects a time when story-telling was all that was available.

Today my curiosity lead me to read that “the principal values held by those with auditory dominance are strength in self and others and hard work in spite of adversity,”² which is exactly what I saw in that professor today. In case this professor never hears words of appreciation from a student, I hope that someone who is able to read this will join me in appreciating her.

Thank you,

From a visitor who sat in on your class today

Former Prime Minister speaks to World Regions class

CollegiateTimes.com

Former Australian Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, followed through with the promise he made earlier in the semester when he met with John Boyer’s World Regions class in McBryde Hall via Skype last night.

Currently a member of the Australian Parliament, Rudd spoke in regard to his article published in Foreign Affairs this month, “Beyond the Pivot: A New Road Map for U.S.-Chinese Relations.”

The “pivot” Rudd mentions refers to Washington’s reinforcement of military and political presence in the Pacific in response to recently increased aggression in that region.

The main topics conversation included the United States’ Pacific presence, the situation in North Korea, the rise of China as a world power and its value as an ally.

The core challenge though, is “how (to) manage the rise of China peacefully,” Rudd said

Boyer encouraged his students to come prepared with questions for the former Prime Minister about foreign policy, specifically the “pivot.”

“This guy has a ton of experience and a lot of foresight,” Boyer said of Rudd.

Senior economics major, Cody Eanes, asked Rudd about the response of the Australian public to current tensions in southeast Asia, if any aggression would affect trade in the region, and if he has a suggestion for a safe solution to the North Korean situation.

Most of Boyer’s students have opinions on the situation in Asia and the United States’ presence there, a topic that’s caused much controversy in the world of politics of late.

“We need to make our presence known… and make sure we protect our allies in case anything happens,” said Taylor Reed, sophomore animal and poultry science major. “The key is to make sure we don’t (take) opposite sides with the whole North Korea issue because that could escalate… and affect the entire planet.”

However, freshman geography major, Lucas Looney, disagrees.

“I think we have really solid economic ties and maybe we don’t agree on some social aspects, but I don’t feel like there’s any animosity between the countries,” Looney said.

In his article, Rudd calls Washington’s refocusing on Asia “entirely appropriate,” which he reiterated last night.

“Without such a move, there was a danger that China, with its hard-line, realist view of international relations, would conclude that an economically exhausted United States was losing its staying power in the Pacific,” Rudd said.

Reed saw the Skype call as a valuable experience.

“You can get different perspectives, see what’s happening on the other side of the world, it’s huge,” said Reed.

Largely, students seemed to appreciate the ability to talk to Rudd.

“It means that we’re important, obviously, if the former Prime Minister of Australia will talk to a World Regions class,” said Looney. “We must be doing something right.”

Big Event 2013 gears up

CollegiateTimes.com

The Big Event statsIt will be an early morning for 6,500 students on Saturday, as they gather to show their support for one of the largest student-run community service events in the country: the 12th annual Big Event at Virginia Tech.

Sponsored by Capital One, this year’s Big Event will feature speakers including Christina McClung of Capital One, an alumna and founder of the Big Event.

Doug Brainard, senior finance major and director of the Big Event team, calls the event “a big way to say ‘thank you’ to the community.”

Students will be assigned service projects such as washing windows, painting or yard work at residential and community locations throughout Blacksburg, Christiansburg and sometimes even as far as Roanoke.

“It’s an opportunity for students to embrace the school’s motto ‘Ut Prosim’ (while) redefining the typical college student to the skeptical homeowner in the area,” Brainard said.

Marcela Roy, a fifth-year senior environmental policy and planning major, who has participated in the event several times, has been assigned to plant gardens and fix a well at an elementary school in Christiansburg.

“The students would come out and they would help garden as well, so it connected us in that way,” Roy said. “We saw (how important) it was to the students.”

The event serves to revamp, and in some cases repair, the link between the students and faculty of the university and the residents of the surrounding community.

“Overall, I think it increases your relationship with the community,” said Roy. “I gained more knowledge of…what was lacking or what could be improved upon.”

However, the number of 6,500 volunteers for this year, made up primarily of Virginia Tech students, with help from faculty alumni and a few Blacksburg High School students, is down from last year’s 6,800.

Still, there is a general upward trend with projects and volunteers, according to Cody Watson, senior history major and co-director of projects for the Big Event.

Although the Big Event at Virginia Tech has been designated the largest event of its kind on the East Coast and second largest in the nation — only behind Texas A&M, where the event originated — there is still room for improvement.

This year, the Big Event team is focused on improving the internal structure by leaving some larger volunteer teams unassigned at first, to account for teams that don’t show up to be assigned projects.

“This year, we’re trying to ensure that someone at least sets foot at each project (site),” Watson said.

While there aren’t as many volunteers this year, the Big Event team is optimistic that there won’t be as many no-shows.

“There’s not much accountability if you take your project to actually show up to your job site, so we do the best we can with volunteers to keep them accountable,” Brainard said. “We’re hoping that we have a higher completion rate of our projects.”

Other improvements this year include the entertainment lineup.

The day will feature performances by the Low Techs, a cappella ensembles, and up-and-coming country star Nick Smith will be performing after the event.

“(It’s) bigger this year than it has been in the past,” Watson said.

However, one of the biggest problems the Big Event team will have to deal with on the day of the event is homeowner-volunteer relations.

“Having to…hold peers responsible…to represent the school, to represent the Big Event, is a project,” Watson said. “We’ve been dealing with the homeowners for the entire year, but now…the main interaction they get is with the volunteers, so we have to make sure…that goes well, or else it’s a bad reflection on the whole ordeal.”

Nevertheless, Brainard assures that every year, satisfaction with the event among members of the community is very high.

“I think if you were to go to most homeowners that were surrounded by a bunch of students, you might hear a lot of horror stories,” Brainard said. “This definitely works toward redefining that stereotype to try to make it a positive interaction where we’re not two separate bodies. We’re all residents of Blacksburg.”